Archives for posts with tag: impressions ‘verse

As I’ve mentioned I’m going to try to do Camp Nanowrimo in April. I haven’t posted anything lately because I’m kind of afraid to, at least when it concerns nanowrimo. Because, well, last time it went to hell, didn’t it? And maybe it will this time too. I really hope not.

Until April, though, I have a couple snippets of the novel for you.

***

A/N: A possible beginning to the story.

Riley Hopkins had been staring at the blank computer screen for quite a while. The vertical line towards the top left of the screen kept blinking, in and out of existence. If she flicked her eyes down to the bottom right corner she could see that another fifteen minutes had passed. She would have to go to sleep soon. But the daily diary entry was mandatory, and so she stared at the screen just a little bit onger, before fixing her fingers on the keyboard. Typing noises filled the air of the small apartment, as she forced herself to think of some trivial details to write down. There had been no mission. Nothing was out of the ordinary. And her microwavable ready-meal had tasted like carrots. Satisfied, she saved the entry onto the database and turned off the computer.

Riley had a mission in the morning, so it was time for bed.

***

A/N: A conversation between the antagonist and the protagonist’s mentor.

“We’re the same kind of people,” Murdoch says calmly, like he knows, like he’s in Hayes’ head. And if anybody can be in Hayes’ head, it’s Murdoch. And that scares him more than anything, because he still wants to believe they’re not the same. He wants to believe that he’s good still, strong still, courageous as he used to be. “You and I, Hayes,” Murdoch says and approaches him. Looks down on him. “If you hadn’t given yourself up for research, your own research, you and I could have worked together. We could have shared it all.” And Hayes is paralyzed, because Murdoch wants him to be. He is filled with renewed contempt for the man in front of him, a man who is way more delusional and idealistic than he is. The biggest difference between them also defines them. Hayes believes in the power of the people, but Murdoch believes only in the power of himself. What a dangerous person to be about to run the country.

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If you’ve been reading my previous blog entries you know that I’ve been considering writing a story that involves chemically engineered angels, lesbians and a very corrupt government. The first part of it(most likely the prologue) is posted here under the title “First Impressions”. I’ve revised it, I’ve had a good think, and I think it’s something worth doing.
To give you some background on the story:

Riley is one of the victims of an aggressive government experiment that leaves her invisible to virtually everyone. But the purpose of this invisibility is to enable her and the others like her to help and protect people who are valuable to the government. Those people are the only ones who can see her.

Having been like this for three years, 22 year old Riley comes across a girl called Jess. She is not Riley’s charge, not meant to be protected, but still Jess can see her. Puzzled and thrown, Riley goes to the government and demands answers, none of which are given.

Riley keeps meeting Jess, who gets increasingly curious of who Riley is and why she’s invisible to everyone else. As her snooping becomes more and more personal, and by proxy a threat to the government, they decide to take her out.

If Riley saves her and hides her away, the government will surely use their trackers to find Riley and kill her instead(or possibly something even worse), but if she doesn’t, she will have to watch as they kill Jess. The only person who has cared about her for the last three years, the only person who has made her feel something other than what the government programmed her to feel, dead.

If only there was a hidden third option.

What I’m wondering now, is whose point of view should I tell the story from? Should I tell it from Riley’s POV and explain who she is and why she’s like that from the get-go, or should I tell it from Jess’ POV and leave it a mystery for half the book? That is the question.

If anybody has an opinion, I’d love to hear it!

To continue with the Nanowrimo theme, the following is a comment I posted on Nanowrimo’s Romance:: LGBT Forum with the purpose of pimping out my plots and maybe getting an opinion or two on them.

So… I’m 16 now and I’ve been writing M/M since I was 12. It wasn’t until last year I started writing F/F as well, and this year I’m deciding between two very different plots.

1.Tommy is a punkrocker from a small town in Pennsylvania(subject to change) who has just moved to New York. There he joins a band and meets a wonderful girl who he falls in love with. He also meets a guy, who annoys him greatly at first. But this guy is persistent, and they start to become friends. Before Tommy knows it, Cameron is his best friend. His confidante. The person who calms him down when he fights with his band, his girlfriend and his family. Cameron nestles his way into his life and when tragedy strikes – he’s all that’s left.
This is aimed to be a dark romance, with Cameron mostly out to satisfy himself(he has some sort of hidden agenda that I haven’t quite figured out yet), BUT he also develops serious feelings for Tommy, which means this story could either have a happy ending with Cameron abandoning his evil plotting, or an ambiguous ending where Cam has gotten away with his scam, broken Tommy’s heart – and by extension his own.

2.Riley used to be an ordinary teenager. She had a pleasant enough life, some troubles at home because her parents wouldn’t accept that she was gay, but otherwise she was okay. But Riley is one of the few people that were chosen to become an “Angel”. The Angels are a secret government experiment that looks to be more from a science fiction film than reality. Angels are people that are invisible to everyone but the people that they’re meant to protect and watch over. The only other person who can see them is their soul mate(this was a biproduct of the genetic modification that the government never expected).
Jess is a 17 year old shy, quiet girl who is just going to her first party. There she meets Riley, apparently her classmate’s sister that he’s never talked about. She’s suspicious of her, and sometimes it feels like she’s not even there. Despite all of that, she can’t help but fall in love with her.

I’ve obviously thought through option 1 a lot more when it comes to detailed plot, but something about the sci-fi and mystery of option 2 makes me want to write that. The Angels are a concept that I’ve been working on for 3 years and in the beginning it was supposed to be a fantasy thing. It’s only this year that I’ve decided to make it sci-fi instead, mostly because I like the idea of the government having thought of this special breed of people to exist for the sole purpose of protecting others. It’s inspired by both vampire books, Charmed and Captain America xD

So if anyone wants to give me their opinion on these plots to help me decide which one to write, that would be more than welcome! 🙂

(my penname on nanowrimo.org is whereJIJisalive)

A/N: I don’t really know what this is, to be honest, I don’t even know if I like it. But it’s different from what I usually write so I thought because of that it might be worth posting. As I’ve said, I do a lot of experiments with my writing lately, just to sort of see what I can do and not just keep to simple things. Interpret this how you like, I have something in mind for these characters for the future. I don’t know if this scene will be incorporated, but I like how these characters are in my mind and I’m actually thinking of writing a fantasy story around them. More on that later, though. Thanks, whoever you are, for reading my blog =)

Jess looked around the room awkwardly, holding a cider in her hand when suddenly a girl appeared next to her.

“Hi,” she said.

“Erm, hi,” Jess answered, surprised and not used to people initiating conversations with her.

“You enjoying the party, then?” The girl asked, friendly and inquisitive.

“Yeah, sure,” Jess said, apparently not too convincingly because the girl gave her a look that told her she didn’t believe her. “No, not really,” she conceded. “Parties aren’t really my thing.”

“No, mine neither. I’m Riley,” she said, offering her hand for Jess to shake.

“Jess,” Jess paused and looked at the woman she was facing. She was older than her – maybe a year or two – had short, dark blonde hair, a piercing through her eyebrow and a grey band t-shirt(Black Sabbath). That’s how Jess noticed people. Little, scattered things about them that caught her attention. It wouldn’t be until later, when they were stood on the balcony away from the people inside, that she noticed her burgundy slim jeans and the tattoo on her left  collarbone that she couldn’t make out the exact shape of in the relative darkness.

“So why are you here if you don’t like parties?” Riley asked her, above the noise of the music they were playing.

Jess smiled. “Half my class is here, they kind of dragged me,” she confessed.

“Oh, I know the feeling,” Riley said, taking a sip of her beer. Then she seemed to realise something. “Oh, so you’re in Robbie’s class then?”

“Yeah, why?”

“I’m his big sister,” Riley smiled, and that was when Jess noticed her piercing cheekbones.

“Oh, okay,” Jess said, slightly surprised. Although she could see the similarities between her artistic classmate and the girl in front of her. “How old are you, then?” She asked, feeling a little lame. She didn’t really know the rules of conversation in a situation like this. She didn’t even know what sort of situation it was.

“I’m 19,” Riley said, and looked around her as somebody raised the volume of the music. “You want to go outside?” she half-shouted, leaning into Jess. To make her voice carry, no doubt.

On the inside Jess was shocked, intrigued, and a little bit scared. Maybe it was that kind of a situation. Despite herself, she was excited. She said yes, and let herself be led through the house, Riley’s hand always touching some part of her, casually, as if they had been friends for years. The hand eventually landed on the small of Jess’ back, as Riley had closed the door to the balcony.

“I hope I’m not being too forward,” Riley said, and Jess’ heart skipped a beat. Or several.

“No, no, course not,” she heard herself say even though she wasn’t sure at all.

This was when Jess noticed the warmth radiating off the girl in front of her, and how much taller she was, since they were standing so close together. Riley looked into her eyes, not moving a muscle. The moment intensified.

This was when Jess noticed herself, standing on the other end of the balcony, a ghostly pressure on her lips.